Saturday, May 15, 2010

The Thunder Pot

thunder pot 001

My mother gave me this beautiful old chamber pot when I visited her last week. It belonged to her grandmother, Grandmother Belin, who lived in Warren, Arkansas.

"Grandmother Belin always called it the thunder pot," Mother said.

A little research told me that "thunder pot" was a common term for a chamber pot. When a home lacked indoor plumbing, the "thunder pot" was placed under the bed and used at night as a urinal.

I love the pink roses that decorate both sides of the chamber pot.

thunder pot 002

thunder pot 006 This mark on the bottom indicates that it was made by Revere China in Akron, Ohio. Since Revere China closed in 1908, my chamber pot is more than 100 years old.

So far I haven't been able to find any more information on Revere China chamber pots, so I have no idea how much it might be worth. I am assuming these were fairly common, although I did read about some chamber pots that were used in Britain during World War II that had pictures of the Kaiser on the inside. The are said to be highly collectible.

thunder pot 009

I've found the perfect place to display it on the dresser in my "girlie" room. The pictures are of my grandparents, Grancy and Poosie. Grandmother Belin was Grancy's mother.

bijw9y For more lovely things in pink, be sure to visit Beverly at How Sweet the Sound. And while you're browsing around, take time to leave a comment. Bloggers appreciate knowing you stopped by.

15 comments:

Sue said...

Hi Kathy, I enjoy reading your blog..

debbie said...

HAPPY PINK SATURDAY KATHY.
THAT IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THUNDER POT I HAVE EVER SEEN. MY DH'S GRANNY LIVED IN MIDWAY, ARKANSAS AND HIS GRANDPARENTS IN DONALDSON, ARKANSAS AND THEY CALLED THEM THUNDER POTS. OH, HOW THE GRANDCHILDREN ROARED IN LAUGHTER HEARING STORIES ABOUT THE THUNDER POT. I WOULD THINK THAT THE SENTIMENTAL VALUE WOULD BE PRICELESS.
IT IS GORGEOUS.
HUGS
SIMPLY DEBBIE
IT IS SO VERY GOOD TO TALK TO YOU...IT HAS BEEN A WHILE. I HAVE NOW ALSO STARTED A BLOG CALLED SIMPLY DEBBIE.

susan said...

Kathy-Very interesting background information. It's beautiful, but I'm thankful for indoor plumbing :)
It would make a beautiful container for flowers in a centerpiece too.

Couture de Papier said...

Beautiful roses and treasure ..love your blog banner too!
Thank You HPS!

Debbie@Debbie-Dabble said...

Now that is such a pretty chamber pot!!

Love the sweet flowers on it!!

HPS!!

Debbie

marty (A Stroll Thru Life) said...

Such a beautiful Thunder Pot and the flowers are just gorgeous. What a treasure. Hugs, Marty

nanny said...

My mother lived in Warren......

nanny said...

Too pretty to use/ha

SPLENDEROSA said...

Lovely pics for a happy Pink Saturday. Come see me when you have time. Have a lovely weekend. Marsha

Ann said...

Never used a thunder pot but my grandma had a few. We did use the "outhouse" when I was young, she didn't have indoor plumbing. The one you have is certainly decorated beautifully. Happy Pink Sat.

© Jennifer Raley said...

Happy Pink Saturday! Great post. Very pretty "thunder pot" and what a name for it! Thanks, Jenn

Connie said...

I've never been to your blog before, sweetpea, and thought I'd come by to visit someone new for Pink Saturday. Nice to meet you. I've never been to your state and too old to travel anymore.
xoxo,
Connie

fitty's pinky rose cottage said...

aww that is one precious treasure! has so many history in it.. thanks for sharing and happy PS

ALWAYS THE ABRAMYANS said...

How beautiful! I've never heard of a chamber pot. Funny how something so pretty could be used for something not so pretty! Ha! Anyway it's very very pretty! A perfect pink Saturday piece!

Malvie said...

@"Always"---Not only are there chamber pots (thunder pots, thunder mugs), but they were a menace in the cities. Servants would open the bedroom window and dump the contents on the sidewalk below--you had to beware walking under open windows! Which leads us to a variety of other unfortunate stories. Neither Buckingham Palace nor the Palace of Versailles had any provision for restroom facilities. Guests simply used the staircases. Imagine the odor and sanitary situation. At grand banquets of the day, a screen would be placed in a corner of the banquet hall, staffed with servants. A guest would merely walk behind the screen where a thunder pot would be waiting, along with a servant who would help with clothing, wiping, etc. Guest would do their business, in the same room, behind a screen, where the banquet was taking place.

There are a lot of things to dislike about the 21st Century---but modern plumbing facilities rank right up there at the top of things to like.

Oh, and until modern times a "commode" was a chest, possibly with drawers. Wealthy people hid their thunder pots in a commode, as opposed to under the bed. Victoria had a commode made that opened up into a seat for her, with a chamber pot underneath the hole. Others copied the innovation, and that's why toilets are also called "commodes".